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Five little-known curiosities about the Brandenburg Gate, Berlin

The Brandenburg Gate is a neoclassical monument in Berlin. It is located on the western side of Pariser Platz in the Mitte district bordering the Tiergarten district.

It is probably the most famous and best known landmark of the German capital, opened to the public as far back as 6 August 1791 and appreciated by all tourists and travellers to Germany ever since.

From Napoleon's entry to the construction of the Berlin Wall, the Brandenburg Gate has remained in the background of major European historical events for more than two centuries. There is no shortage of curiosities and mysteries surrounding this monument.

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Five curiosities about the Brandenburg Gate
The Brandenburg Gate is a neoclassical gateway to Berlin. It is located on the western side of Pariser Platz in the Mitte district bordering the Tiergarten district. It is probably the most famous and well-known landmark of the German capital, opened to the public as far back as 6 August 1791 and appreciated by all tourists and travellers to Germany ever since. From Napoleon's entry to the construction of the Berlin Wall, the Brandenburg Gate has remained in the background of major European historical events for more than two centuries. There is no shortage of curiosities and mysteries surrounding this monument.
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Symbol of division in the postwar period.
The Brandenburg Gate was included in the border area between East and West during the division of Berlin. In fact, during the Cold War, the Brandenburg Gate became a symbol of division and separation. It was located right along the border between the Soviet and American sectors of the city.
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Historical discourses and Soviet reactions
The Brandenburg Gate has been the site of important historical events, including speeches by famous politicians such as John F. Kennedy and Ronald Reagan during the Cold War. During JFK's speech in 1963, the Soviets also hung large red banners on it to prevent him from looking east.
Di Bundesarchiv, B 145 Bild-F079009-0032 / CC-BY-SA 3.0, CC BY-SA 3.0 de, https://commons.wikimedia.
Tear down this wall
Staying with the Cold War theme, let us turn from one historic US president to another, namely Ronald Reagan. In his 1987 speech in front of the Brandenburg Gate, the US President uttered these words, addressing the General Secretary of the USCP Michail Gorbačëv, which still remain in history today: 'General Secretary Gorbačëv, if you seek peace, if you seek prosperity for the Soviet Union and for Eastern Europe, if you seek liberalisation, come here to this door. Mr. Gorbačëv, open this door. Mr. Gorbačëv, tear down this wall!".
Di Drrcs15 - Opera propria, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=33364136
The door on the euros
Perhaps not everyone knows that on many German euros (10, 20 and 50 centimes) on the customisable side (the other is the same in all countries) is the Brandenburg Gate.
Di א (Aleph)Creator: Johann Gottfried Schadow - Opera propria, CC BY-SA 2.5, https://commons.wikime
The history of the quadriga
The quadriga on the upper door was created in 1794 by Johann Gottfried Schadow. Napoleon I took it to Paris in 1807 as spoils of war. However, in 1814, Prussian soldiers brought it back, and added the iron cross to the crown surmounting the pole in the hand of the goddess of peace.
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