CITY

What to see in Dubrovnik? Some places not to miss

Dubrovnik, now known as Dubrovnik, is a city located on the coast of southern Croatia. Known as 'the pearl of the Adriatic', the city stands out for its exceptional historical and architectural value. 

Its historical centre, surrounded by impressive medieval walls, is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The city is renowned for its mild climate, breathtaking views of the Adriatic Sea and its vibrant cultural life, with various exhibitions, concerts and festivals. Finally, for food lovers, Dubrovnik offers authentic flavours of traditional Dalmatian cuisine.

Here are some places not to miss if you are in this beautiful city.

What to see in Dubrovnik Some places not to miss
Dubrovnik, now known as Dubrovnik, is a city located on the coast of southern Croatia. The city is renowned for its mild climate, breathtaking views of the Adriatic Sea and its vibrant cultural life, with various exhibitions, concerts and festivals. Finally, for food lovers, Dubrovnik offers authentic flavours of traditional Dalmatian cuisine. Here are some places not to miss if you are in this beautiful city. (Source: wikipedia)
Di dronepicr - Old Port and historical center of Dubrovnik, Croatia, a view from the south, CC BY 2.
The Pearl of the Adriatic
Known as 'the pearl of the Adriatic', the city stands out for its exceptional historical and architectural value. Its historical centre, surrounded by impressive medieval walls, is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
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"Game of Thrones"
Dubrovnik is also known for being the setting for some scenes in the popular TV show 'Game of Thrones'. Walking along this line of defence offers spectacular views and the impression of entering a fragment of Dubrovnik's history, albeit a painful one.
Di Diego Delso, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=32496037
The walls of Ragusa
The walls of Dubrovnik were built between the 13th and 17th centuries for defensive purposes. They are 1940 metres long, 25 metres high and 4-6 metres wide on land and 1.5-3 metres wide on sea. There are several towers along their perimeter. Inside the walls, at the time of the Republic of Ragusa, around 1272, there were approximately 2,000 inhabitants. In the 15th century, the number of residents rose to about 6,000. (Source: wikipedia)
Di Tae Hyeon Kim - Imported from 500px (archived version) by the Archive Team. (detail page), CC BY-
The Stradun
The Stradun is Ragusa's main street axis, cutting the city in two, connecting Porta Pile with Piazza della Loggia. This street in Ragusa is also called Corso in Italian, and Placa in the local Croatian dialect. The construction of the Stradun is said to have once been due to the silting up of a tongue of sea that divided the insular part of the city - ancient Lausa - from the Slavic suburb that arose on the slopes of Mount St. Sergius, corresponding to the present-day Prijeko district.
Di Dennis Jarvis from Halifax, Canada - Croatia-01559 - Big Onofrio's Fountain, CC BY-SA 2.0, h
Great Onofrio Fountain
The large Onofrio fountain is located in the centre of the small square after the entrance from Porta Pile. It was built in 1438 by the Neapolitan builder Onofrio Giordano, also known as Onofrio della Cava, with whom the Republic had concluded a contract for the construction of the town aqueduct. Onofrio brought water to the city from the Šumet spring, twelve kilometres from the city, from which the Ombla River originates.
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Old Port
Porto Vecchio, located east of the old town, was Ragusa's main port until the beginning of the 20th century, later replaced by Gravosa. It owes its shape to the intervention of the local engineer Pasquale di Michele from Ragusa, who, starting in 1484, restructured it by connecting it to the system of fortifications of San Luca and San Giovanni, while at the same time creating the Casse dam to protect the port as a breakwater. The name derives from the thousands of crates full of stones sunk off the coast of Ragusa, which were used for its reconstruction in 1667.
Di Joanbanjo - Opera propria, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=19873407
Church of St. Blaise
The patron saint of Ragusa is St Blaise. The church dedicated to him stands at the end of the Stradun, in Piazza della Loggia. The church is accessed via a flight of steps. The present building was preceded by a 14th-century Romanesque-style church, severely damaged during the 1667 earthquake and finally destroyed by a fire in 1706, which also almost completely destroyed the remarkable collection of sacred furnishings and works of art contained in the church.
Di Diego Delso, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=32496065
Cathedral of St. Mary Major
The Cathedral of St Mary Major is dedicated to the Assumption of Mary. The first religious building of the same name and on the same site was erected between the 6th and 7th centuries in Byzantine style. Between the 12th and 14th centuries, the cathedral was completely rebuilt in the Romanesque style. According to legend, the reconstruction was also made possible by a donation from King Richard I of England. In fact, the English sovereign is said to have decided to make this contribution as thanks to the city for a rescue at sea during a shipwreck, which allegedly occurred not far from the port of Ragusa.
Art galleries private collections
20/02/2024
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