ADVENTURE

Some of the most spectacular and incredible volcanoes in the world

Spectacular, imposing, sometimes a little frightening: volcanoes are complex but often magnificent geological structures that contribute to defining the visual identity of the places where they rise.

Some volcanoes are continuously active, others are in quiescence, others are now extinct, but it does not matter: admiring a volcano is a unique experience, as is climbing its slopes on a hike through a unique territory.

Here are some of the most spectacular volcanoes to visit around the world and where they are located.

Freepik, Getty Images, Wikimedia Commons
Some of the most spectacular and incredible volcanoes in the world
Spectacular, imposing, sometimes a little frightening: volcanoes are complex but often magnificent geological structures that contribute to defining the visual identity of the places where they rise. Some volcanoes are continuously active, others are in quiescence, others are now extinct, but it matters little: admiring a volcano is a unique experience, as is climbing its slopes on a hike through a unique territory. Here are some of the most beautiful volcanoes to visit around the world.
Freepik
Mount Fuji, Honshu (Japan)
At 3,776 metres, the magnificent Fuji is Japan's highest mountain and one of the country's three sacred mountains along with Mount Tate and Mount Haku. Every year, Mount Fuji is visited by many tourists and pilgrims: there are 25 UNESCO World Heritage sites and numerous (and relaxing) hot springs near Fuji.
Freepik
Vesuvius, Naples (Italy)
Vesuvius dominates the Gulf of Naples and is currently in a dormant state, but constantly monitored because an eruption could be extremely dangerous, given the high population living on its slopes. The last eruptive activity dates back to 1944 and today the national park of the same name rises around Vesuvius, very important from a geological, biological and historical point of view.
Petr Meissner, Wikimedia Commons
Erta Ale, Afar (Ethiopia)
Erta Ale is a shield volcano 613 metres above sea level, characterised by the fact that it is continually erupting, although without explosions: in essence, Erta Ale resembles an immense lake of seething lava.
Freepik
Kilimangiaro, Rombo (Tanzania)
Kilimanjaro is a dormant stratovolcano, which at 5895 metres above sea level is the highest mountain in Africa, the highest single mountain in the world and one of the highest volcanoes on the planet. The summit of the volcano is covered by a perennial glacier and there is no certain information as to when the last eruption took place. However, the testimonies handed down by the local inhabitants speak of eruptive activity around 170 years ago.
Freepik
Stromboli, islands Eolie (Italy)
Located on the island of the same name in the Aeolian Islands archipelago, Stromboli is 926 metres above sea level and reaches a depth of between 1300 and 2400 metres below sea level. Stromboli is a volcano characterised by regular explosions, some of them very spectacular.
Getty Images
Yellowstone Caldera, Wyoming (USA)
The Yellowstone caldera is the caldera of the supervolcano that lies beneath the famous and beautiful Yellowstone National Park. The caldera measures about 55 kilometres by 72 and its last eruption is thought to be about 640,000 years old. The famous park with its magnificent wilderness lies around it.
Freepik
Teide, Tenerife (Spain)
Teide rises on the island of Tenerife in the Canarian archipelago. At 3715 metres above sea level, this volcano is the highest peak in Spain. Although there have been no eruptions since 1909, the volcano is still active. The high temperature of the rocks near Teide indicates the persistent activity and causes the phenomenon of fumaroles, i.e. the emission of sulphurous vapours.
Pixabay
Mauna Kea, Hawaii (USA)
Mauna Kea last erupted around 4,500 years ago and, together with Mauna Loa and Kilauea, which are much more active than it, is one of the three volcanoes that gave rise to the island of Hawaii, the largest of the archipelago of the same name. When measured from its base, which is almost 5760 metres below sea level, Mauna Kea exceeds in elevation even Everest.
Juhász Péter, Wikimedia Commons
Laki, Klaustur (Iceland)
Laki is a volcanic crater complex located not far from Skaftafell National Park. The Laki system is famous for an eruption that occurred between 1783 and 1784, in which lava fountains and 14 cubic kilometres of basalt began to emerge from a fault. This eruption caused fluoride poisoning of some of the inhabitants, but above all the death of 50% of the island's livestock: the consequence was a severe famine that caused the death of about 25% of the Icelandic population.
Getty Images
Etna, Catania (Italy)
Etna's continuous eruptions over time have modified, sometimes profoundly, the landscape surrounding this splendid volcano. Etna's environment is unique because it is very varied: its surface is characterised by alternating urban landscapes, thick forests and desolate areas covered by magmatic rock, periodically subject to snow: in fact, one can even ski on this volcano thanks to the presence of ski lifts.
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